Faculty Advisor(s)

G. Noel Squires

Document Type

Course Paper

Publication Date

12-4-2015

Rights

© 2015 Stephanie Bordignon

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The use of body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and overground gait training (GT) has been shown to improve bilateral coordination and gait symmetry for patients experiencing chronic stroke. Evidence to support BWSTT rather than overground GT for use following chronic stroke is mixed and does not include representation for the young stroke population. The purpose of this case report is to describe the outcomes of gait speed, efficiency of gait, and fall risk in an individual following a chronic stroke managed with intense BWSTT and overground GT. Description: 43 year old male was managed with BWSTT 5x/week for 12 weeks following a stroke. He presented with left hemiparesis, spasticity of his left upper and lower extremities, and decreased sensation on the left. He demonstrated decreased gait speed, functional strength, and range of motion. Outcomes: There was a decrease in the level of assistance needed during ambulation from baseline to discharge. Although not statistically significant, his TUG, Gait Speed, 2 Minute Walk Test, and Berg also improved. Discussion: The patient demonstrated mixed overall gains with management. Similarly, publications report various findings supporting BWSTT as well. Perhaps this can be attributed to a couple factors. One, stroke severity and symptoms vary among individual patients. Two, previous research has been performed on heterogeneous populations of patients that have had a stroke. Perhaps if a study was performed on a homogenous population of patients who have had a stroke, we may see different results. Further research is warranted in the area of BWSTT and a homogeneous patient population.

Comments

The case report poster for this paper can be found here:

http://dune.une.edu/pt_studcrposter/48/

Files over 3MB may be slow to open. For best results, right-click and select "save as..."

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.