Faculty Advisor(s)

Michael Fillyaw

Document Type

Course Paper

Publication Date

12-8-2016

Abstract

Stroke is the primary cause of disability and care dependency in adults in the United States. Research has found that the risk of mortality post stroke can be greatly reduced through stroke rehabilitation. The purpose of this case report is to provide a framework of physical therapy rehabilitation that facilitated functional mobility and gait in a patient who experienced a stroke. The patient was a 50-year old male who was admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital for physical therapy following a left middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke four days prior. The patient received three weeks of physical therapy after displaying right hemiparesis, apraxia and aphasia, abnormal tone, and impaired strength, balance, and mobility. Procedural interventions incorporated task-specific training including transfers and bed mobility, therapeutic activities, neuromuscular re-education, therapeutic exercise, wheelchair management, balance training, and gait training with varying levels of assistance including: harness system, robot-assisted, and over-ground. Progression was documented through Functional Independence Measure and improvements were noted in strength, balance, functional mobility and gait. Gains in these areas may be consistent with daily physical therapy with progressing interventions. Further research should investigate the benefits of specific interventions and the intensity for this population.

Comments

The case report poster for this paper can be found here:

http://dune.une.edu/pt_studcrposter/102

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